Failed to Sync Update. Error: The Microsoft Software License Terms have not been completely downloaded and cannot be accepted.

I was seeing the above error in the Configuration Manager 2012 SP1 wsyncmgr.log in a customer environment and I suspected this was as a result of SQL services being interrupted during the WSUS syncronisation process – which is never a good thing.  Despite trying to remove classifications and removing/reinstalling the SUP role the problem persisted.  When I loaded up the WSUS console and filtered for all updates I noticed that around 12 updates were showing that their content download (the EULA) had not been successfully downloaded.  I simply highlighted the affected updates, right clicked and chose to “Retry Download” and these changed to Pending Download and eventually all was OK.  A re-sync in Configuration Manager then resulted in a happy wsyncmgr.log and a successful sync event.

There is apparently a hotfix available for this issue which might be worth a try if you encounter this issue when proxy credentials are required;

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2838998

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Task Sequence step fails with ‘Incorrect Function’

This is just a quick post to help anyone out understanding what this error actually means.  In a task sequence, particularly an MDT integrated one, there will be tasks which use command line tools such as cscript.exe or xcopy.exe and when these fail to run you often get a traditional MSDOS based error code such as 1, 2, 3, 5 etc.  Error 1: Incorrect function, is usually when you have something that is running something like “cscript.exe myscript.vbs” but the script specified cannot be found to be ran.  Check your script location and paths.

.NET Framework failed to register Configuration Manager dll’s

I had a recent interesting experience where Configuration Manager 2012 SP1 setup completed successfully however there were problems lurking under the hood.  It was only until I proceeded to configure the environment and add additional roles that these came to light.  Several of the component installations failed, in particular those of the newer roles which require .NET 4.0 and their respective logs showed some very unusual errors I had never, ever, seen before.  The CloudMgr.log was absolutely full of instance creation errors.

At first I put this down to the Windows Server 2008 R2 virtual machine – it was based on an image and provided to me in a bit of a rush and with some history of a power failure/unexpected shutdowns – however a fresh DVD installation of the Operating System resulted in the same errors.  My attention then turned to the ISO media provided on the server that I extracted and performed the installation from – perhaps it was corrupt?  Not quite, but it was the cause of the problem.

The ISO file had been copied up to the server by somebody else over the network and for some reason the server took to marking the file in it’s properties with “This file came from another computer and might be blocked to help protect this computer” and gave me an unblock button.  I hadn’t noticed this and the result was that all of the subsequent extracted files were all marked the same.

windows-server-2012-unblock-file

The problem here is that the regasm.exe utility of .NET Framework 4.0, in it’s default configuration, will not permit the registration of dll’s that it perceives as coming from remote sources such as unc paths.

The answer here is not to proceed with the .config file editing solution offered by the only blog post I found regarding this error, it is simply to ensure that this attribute/property is not applied to any of the files from the Configuration Manager 2012 media before you start installation.  Attempting to patch the installation back together I am sure would be a futile and unsupportable task – there are simply too many possible errors introduced into the installation.  I even found that when you provision site roles on other site systems, the file attribute traveled with the dll’s copied to the remote site system and introduced role issues there.

It’s incredible, how something so random and inert could cause so many issues.